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by • April 12, 2016 • Laundry CareComments (4)7104

Rinse Your Laundry Once, Not Twice!

Rinse Your Laundry Once, Not Twice!

If you or a family member suffers from sensitive skin, you may have grown accustomed to the tedious, time-consumptive, and water-wasting practice of rinsing laundry not once, but twice, just to get rid of the icky residue left behind by most top-shelf conventional laundry detergents.

Rinsing your laundry a second time is a waste of water, time and money. Use a laundry detergent that rinses clean the first timeYou know the drill. Wait for your laundry to rinse, then manipulate the laundry’s settings to run your load through a second rinse. It’s a real hassle – but a necessary evil if you’re not using detergent that rinses cleanly the first time.

Most families wash around 1.1 loads of laundry per day*, which equates to around 400 loads per year. That means that the average family who rinses twice because of a family member’s allergies, eczema, sensitive skin, or other issues essentially runs the rinse cycle 800 times each year – an extra 400 times yearly. That’s a lot of wasted water, energy, and time.

The older your washer and the more loads you wash, the greater your waste. Old, top-loading machines use around 20 to 22.5 gallons of water in the rinse cycle, while newer models use around 13.5 gallons*. Even Energy-Star-certified washers use around 7 gallons.

The average family that rinses twice uses an additional 10,000 gallons of water each year!

The average family that rinses twice uses an additional 10,000 gallons of water each year!  This takes money out of your pocket by raising your water bill and energy costs, all while depleting a valuable natural resource and wasting a resource you can’t get back – your time. Most front-loading machines have a 20-minute rinse cycle, depending on load size and manufacturer. That translates to a massive amount of wasted time going through a second rinse.

Avoiding a second rinse can also  help you rack up savings. For example, if you live in Atlanta, Georgia, it can cost as much as 85 cents** for the water to wash one load of laundry with just one rinse. Add a second rinse, and you’ll pay $1.28 per load. In San Francisco, California, the water to wash a single load of laundry with one rinse will cost you 64 cents. Rinse it twice, and the price tag goes up to 96 cents. Factor in spent energy and your time – and the cost is significantly greater.

 

switching to a clean-rinse detergent like those made by Grab Green, you can rinse once, not twice - saving up to 10,000 gallons of water each year, depending on your particular washer.

By switching to a clean-rinse detergent like those made by Grab Green, you can rinse once, not twice – saving up to 10,000 gallons of water each year, depending on your particular washer.

In laboratory tests, Grab Green’s plant and mineral-based laundry detergents outperformed leading brands like Tide when it comes to rinsability. The secret to this superior rinsability lies in the type of surfactant used in Grab Green’s formulas.

Essentially, a surfactant is an ingredient that allows the detergent to interact with dirt and grime during the washing process, cleaning the fibers. Unlike the “big guys” who make conventional detergents laden with chemical surfactants that resist being rinsed away, Grab Green’s detergents use a plant-derived surfactant that is more readily rinsed and doesn’t cling to clothing in the same way that conventional laundry detergents do – eliminating the need for a second rinse.

*http://www.home-water-works.org/indoor-use/clothes-washer

**https://www.clearlyenergy.com/blog/posts/what-is-the-cost-of-a-load-of-laundry-in-the-us

 

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4 Responses to Rinse Your Laundry Once, Not Twice!

  1. Janet Heeter says:

    Second rinse is essential if you want to have clean laundry. Go ahead, try a second rinse, open the lid during the cycle and SEE how much more soap is being removed! Always, always second rinse.

  2. Alex Ow says:

    Hello Janet,

    With our HE approved formula you can save the water and the extra rinse for another load of laundry. We designed our formula to have fewer suds than traditional detergent so you don’t have to waste the water! I have included some links to our Amazon.com products that have sample sizes available for purchase. Hopefully this helps

    I wanted to reach out and offer you some tips on how to dissolve your pods and also leave some information on where you could get some Grab Green Products.

    1. Try loading the pod directly into your empty drum before you add any laundry.
    2. Check to see if you have “hard water” in your area. Our products were designed to work best in cold, soft, warm and hot water.
    3. Make sure you aren’t “over-stuffing” your washer. The pod needs lots of space and agitation to break down, adding too much laundry could hinder the pod from moving during the wash cycle.
    4. Massage the pod gently so its soft

    Hopefully this helps! If you are still experiencing some issues after trying these tips, please reach out to us so we can assist you further. Have a wonderful day!

    Stoneworks: https://www.amazon.com/Grab-Green-Stoneworks-Laundry-Detergent/dp/B01NAZ2Q6G/ref=sr_1_2_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1494262391&sr=8-2&keywords=stoneworks&th=1
    Classic Scented: https://www.amazon.com/Grab-Green-Magnolia-Dishwasher-Cleaning/dp/B018L7F7SS/ref=sr_1_2_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1494262257&sr=8-2&keywords=grab+green+samples
    Classic Unscented: https://www.amazon.com/Grab-Green-Fragrance-Dishwasher-Cleaning/dp/B018HGUC0Q/ref=sr_1_1_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1494273089&sr=8-1&keywords=grab+green+samples

    Cheers,
    The Grab Green Team

  3. […] a “clean-rinse” detergent. A clean-rinse detergent is easily rinsed out during a normal rinse cycle, so that little to no residual detergent is left […]

  4. nptexas says:

    Unfortunately, I must rinse every load twice because my washer won’t let me adjust the water level. It uses so little water, I sometimes have to wash things two or even three times, especially dirtynkitchen towels. And, yes, I’m mindful of load size. Horrible engineering idea. I save no water at all.

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